Research + News | Topic: Social Media

Sharenting: Solving The Problem Of Parents And Kids On Instagram

Tim Elmore blogs about what parents need to consider regarding their own social media posts involving their kids. Read the blog here.

Teenagers Who Use The Internet, Social Media Or Video Games For More Than An Hour Daily Have ‘Significantly Lower Grades and Test Scores’

Researchers are urging parents to place time limits on their children’s tech use. Read the article here.

How Did We Get So Stuck On Social Media?

Our complicated relationship with social media might be simpler than it feels. Just remember how it started. Read the article here.

Teens And Social Media: ‘Unfollow Some Accounts That Don’t Make You Feel Good’

The Internet has become a destination of endless doom scrolling and incessant comparison, especially as platforms like Instagram have become home to highly edited images that don’t reflect reality, having a disproportionate impact on youth. Read the article here.

A Psychologist’s Advice: How To Talk To Your Kids About Social Media And Drug Abuse

Social Media Use In 2021

A majority of Americans say they use YouTube and Facebook, while use of Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok is especially common among adults under 30. Read the article here.

YouTube Dominates Social Media Reach, TikTok Now Rivals Snapchat, Twitter

In its debut in a highly regarded study of Americans’ social media platform usage, TikTok ranks just behind Snapchat and Twitter, and well ahead of far more established Reddit as a social media destination U.S. adults say they use. Read the article here.

Social Media and Mental Health

Tips for families of older kids and teens from Common Sense Media. Read the article here.

Study Shows Connection Between Social Media Use And Binge Eating In Pre-Teens

Learning to control your social media and TV habits early can help kids make healthier decisions as they get older. Read the article here.

10-Year Study Shows Elevated Suicide Risk From Excess Social Media Time For Teen Girls

Girls who used social media for at least two to three hours per day at the beginning of the study–when they were about 13 years old–and then greatly increased their use over time were at a higher clinical risk for suicide as emerging adults. Read the article here.