Research + News | Topic: Sleep

Teenagers vs. Sleep: How Screen Time Is Getting In The Way

Research from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry shows how constant screen time for teens with and without ADHD affects daily life. Read the article here.

Research Identifies Impact Of Teenage Screen Use

Two thirds of children use more than one screen at the same time after school, in the evenings and at weekends as part of increasingly sedentary lifestyles, according to new research. Read the article here.

Excessive Screen Time Impacts Teens’ Sleep, Weight, And Activity Levels

Experts are particularly concerned about young people using multiple devices at the same time. Read the article here.

Quantity, Content, And Context Of Social Media Use May Affect Adolescents’ Sleep

A new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health found that checking social media often, viewing emotional or violent videos, and starting to use social media at an early age were significantly related to later bedtimes and fewer hours of sleep on school nights for early adolescents. Read the article here.

Teens Did Surprisingly Well In Quarantine

More sleep and family time—and less social media—may have made the difference. Read the article here.

Teenagers Glued To Screens Skipping Meals, Sleep And Homework

Teenagers are skipping meals, sleep and doing their homework to spend more time online, according to a new report which asked young people themselves how their time on the internet affected their lives. Read the article here.

More LOLs, Fewer Zzzs: Teens May Be Losing Sleep Over Social Media

Heavier users of social media get to bed later and get poorer quality sleep. Read the article here.

Further Evidence Bedtime Social Media Use Is Harming Teenagers

A new UK study shows that teenagers who spend 3 or more hours engaging in social media are much more likely to sleep late and to have night awakenings, among other poor sleep habits. Read the article here.

Less Screen Time, More Sleep, Better-Behaved Kids

Researchers found that 8- to 11-year-olds who got adequate sleep and had limits on “screen time” were less likely than their peers to report problems with impulsive behavior. Read the article here.

Many Teens Sleep With Their Phones, Survey Finds – Just Like Their Parents

Four out of five teenagers with mobile devices keep them in their rooms overnight — and nearly a third of those bring them into their beds while sleeping — according a study Wednesday that offered new evidence that mobile devices undermine the rest necessary for peak health. Read the article here.