Research + News | Topic: Instagram

Who Was Molly Russell?

Molly’s story shines a powerful light on what more parents and teens are dealing with than you probably know. Read the article here.

Big Tech Is Co-Parenting Our Children. Yes, Be Afraid.

In “Who’s Raising the Kids?” Susan Linn’s searing indictment of corporate greed, tech companies targeting children are rivaled only by the lawmakers who let them get away with it. Read the book review here.

Instagram’s Newest Copycat Target Is BeReal

Meta is testing yet another feature on Instagram that copies directly from a competitor. Read the article here.

The One Social-Media Feature That People Still Love

Instagram’s Close Friends toes the privacy line by offering users a safe, semipublic space of their own creation. Read the article here.

Instagram Now Defaults New Users Under 16 To Most Restrictive Content Setting

The changes are rolling out to global users across platforms amid increased regulatory pressure over social media apps and their accompanying minor safety issues. Read the article here.

Instagram, TikTok, YouTube Top News Sources for U.K. Teens

Instagram, TikTok and YouTube are now the preferred mode of news consumption for British teenagers, a report by U.K. media regulator Ofcom has found. Read the article here.

Social Ladder: The Anti-Instagrams Are Taking Over

Young people are ditching Instagram in favor of apps that are more candid (and less toxic) as they seek out novel ways to connect. Read the article here.

Instagram Will Start Nudging Teens Away From Content They Continuously Browse Through

It’s meant to keep teens from dwelling on a particular topic. Read the article here.

Meta Rolls out More Parental Controls For Instagram And Virtual Reality

Facebook parent company Meta is rolling out additional parental supervision measures for Instagram and its virtual reality headset, expanding on a suite of tools released in the U.S. in recent months. Read the article here.

BeReal App Is Instagram’s Next Rival For Teens

BeReal asks users to post one candid unedited photo a day. It can’t be “liked” or shared. There are no algorithms or ads. And teens are increasingly choosing a feed that is intentionally boring. Listen to the report here.