Research + News | Topic: Adolescent Development

How Social Media Harms Boys And Girls Differently

For girls, social media may be more harmful than heroin. Read the article here.

Screen Time And The Brain: Expert Advice On Electronic Addiction And Teaching Kids Healthy Tech Habits

Protect Young Minds interviews Dr. Christy Kane to talk about how electronic impact the neurotransmitters in the brain and how to mitigate developing an addiction to electronics. Watch or read the interview here.

New Research Suggests Parents Should Limit Screen Media For Preschoolers

New research from University of California, Davis, suggests that parents should delay introducing their children to any screen media, as well as limit preschool-age children’s use of mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Read the article here.

We Gave Teenagers Smartphones. Did We Rob Them Of An Inner Life?

Teens, more than anyone, need time spent in solitude, where emotions are processed and the brain powers down. Read the article here.

Communications Time Bomb: Parents’ Smartphone Use Could Be The New Secondhand Smoke

Adults’ digital habits could be hazardous to children’s speech and language development. Read the article here.

Too Much Screen Time May Be Stunting Toddlers’ Brains

Toddlers who spend loads of time looking at tablets, smartphones or TVs may be changing their brains, and not for the better. Read the article here.

Less Screen Time, More Sleep, Better-Behaved Kids

Researchers found that 8- to 11-year-olds who got adequate sleep and had limits on “screen time” were less likely than their peers to report problems with impulsive behavior. Read the article here.

Study Finds Sexting May Be A Healthy Part Of Growing Up?!?

University of Texas Medical Branch researchers say that when older teens are sexting – sharing sexually explicit pictures and videos over mobile phones – it may simply be a healthy part of growing up. Read the full article here.

Neuroscience Explains Why Instagram Is So Bad For Teen Girls

Thanks to ongoing brain development and increased sensitivity to dopamine (a neurotransmitter associated with motivation, pleasure and reward), teenagers are more likely to crave reward-based experiences. And, because their prefrontal cortex (the area associated with understanding, evaluation and decision-making) is still developing, social interactions greatly shape impulse control and critical thinking.

Read the rest of the article here.

Activist Campaigns Have Unforeseen Negative Impact On Teens

New research suggests such campaigns can harm vulnerable populations in ways not yet fully understood. Read the article here.